Organic Acids - A Review

Published on: 08/02/2017
Author/s : Hafiz Usama Rasheed DVM, Technical Manager Mian Group Of Companies.

Due to the vast expansion of poultry industry challenges also increases. One of them is the control of microbial population which is done by excessive use of therapeutics antibiotics and AGP’s. The indiscriminate use of these products results in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Apart from resistance it also leads to public health concern. Due to this EU has banned the use of AGP&rsquo...

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dan hofer dan hofer
Poultry farmer
October 1, 2020
Frederic good day and jefo got one called gallinat recop it is good for gut health its encapsulated acids and GARLIC and garlic got to be the healthest herb foe man kind and animals
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Mike Stahl Mike Stahl
Poultry manager
January 31, 2021

dan hofer good day is the Gallinat recop a water based product?

mike

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January 27, 2021
I am using Selko pH in water targetting 3.8pH. However I am noticing that after over a year of continuous use, algae seem to form in the water lines clogging the water filters. Is it caused by the acid?
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Frederic Paris Frederic Paris
Poultry farmer
January 28, 2021

Pol Tarce it looks organic acids can become nutrients sources for algae or even bio films. The formulation we use in Canada is called Pro-Hydro and contain copper sulfate to fight algae. But, a good cleaning with the proper peroxide product between flocks should get rid of these.

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Carlos Augusto Borges Carlos Augusto Borges
Nutricionista
January 28, 2021
Dear Dr Fawad Khalil

Organic acids that are used in animal nutrition are most effective at low pH. For this reason, its action is more efficient in the region close to the proventricle and decreases considerably in the duodenum where the pH is above 5. This is because the organic acids used in nutrition have pKa below 5, consequently the mixtures of these acids will be buffered in the intestinal pH as soon as they pass through the pylorus. Non-encapsulated organic acids are absorbed quickly in the small intestine and the effect of acidification can be reduced from the small intestine of poultry. The encapsulation allows the slow and continuous release of organic acids throughout the intestinal tract, reducing the absorption rate and prolonging the acidification process after the small intestine of the poultry. The mixture of different organic acids provides a synergistic effect that no acid used individually can have. In order for short chain organic acids to reach the final third of the birds' intestines in significant concentrations, these acids must be protected or microencapsulated by fats. The formulation of a product based on organic acids will depend on the objective desired by the customer, as there are differences in efficiency between acids and not all are antimicrobials. As the main objective of using organic acids in birds, the reduction of contamination of E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter in the final portions of the intestine (cecum and colon), where the pH is close to 7, we must use short-chain organic acids encapsulated.
Regards,

Carlos Borges
C Borges Consultoria




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Mike Stahl Mike Stahl
Poultry manager
January 30, 2021
am noticing the same when using organic acids

has anybody got a suggestion on which acid will not do that??

what about PWT from jones and hamilton

any experience out there on that product
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Frederic Paris Frederic Paris
Poultry farmer
January 31, 2021
Mike Stahl As I said, I have no algae problems using the formulation called Selko Pro Hydro in Canada, I’m pretty sure it is the same formulation as Selko PH in others country, but maybe a Trouw Nutrition representative could chime in. Because I have very alkaline water on my farm, I now mix a mineral acid with Selko to help lower PH first and use 1L/1000 L of Selko Pro Hydro to lower cost. I target the same 3.8PH.

As for PWT, I used it for 2 years, pretty efficient to lower the PH, but be aware of the very high load of sodium and sulfates coming with this product. If any of theses 2 minerals already in your water, you may end with very bad litter problems like I did when I used PWT. PWT is SODIUM BISULFATE... I had the worst litter in years using it in summer when water intake was high ...

I was told that Selko PH make is job on gut health and FCR starting at 1L/1000L and PH 4.2 and under. If you wanted to use a mineral only acid, I would use either phosphoric or Hydrochloric acid, the latter being the most economic to use.

Hope it can helps,

Fréderic

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Mike Stahl Mike Stahl
Poultry manager
January 31, 2021

Frederic Paris Thanks for the reply, I think you would want to consult a poultry nutritionist when using pwt, cause of the extra sodium
am also using selko pro hydro, thanks for the advice on the hydrochloric acid, will give it a try.
thanks

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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
January 31, 2021

If you use fat encapsulated once they often can start to dissolve very late and only support the last part of the destine. As fat digestion starts late. You have other stomach protected acids where the way of production make them only soluble in the destine. And which are proven in more than 100 tests in poultry and pigs. only 1 fat coated one showed good results in the registration in Europe to be approved in the acids.
Only 2 Acids have reached the zootechnical registration in Europe which is nearly comparable with the results of antibiotic growth promoters. Even recent US Trials in gíps shows that they are on the same line. So fat encapsulation can work but there are already some solutions out there which show worldwide to be very good. not one in some regional trials.

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January 31, 2021
Thanks Mr Carlos for such a worthy detail.
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January 31, 2021
Pol Tarce Mike Staahl , Don't overlook what you use for a water Sanitizer, Peroxide, chlorine, chlorine dioxide etc..? Organic Acid mixtures can be tricky and have heard numerous reports of peroxide sanitizer causing reactions with organic water acidifiers and plugging nipples/lines haven't heard anything with chlorine based products doing that, yet.

Also do a bacterial water swab of your water lines,(water samples can say they are clean, bacterial swabs are more accurate) find out what you're dealing with. If low levels of bacteria still make it past your sanitizer then 1) look at switching sanitizers, if that is possible, 2) if that is not an option then think about using a buffered inorganic acid versus an organic/inorganic mixture. The negatives of feeding those low levels of bacteria with organic acids far outweigh the supposedly gut health advantages.

Myself ,have had to do that, as I have a peroxide based sanitizer and low levels of Pseudomonas still enter my barn after being Sanitized. The organic Acidifiers made that worse. Lower PH in the 4-5 range can make that worse as well, depending on the bacteria present.

So important to know what bacteria your dealing with !
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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
February 1, 2021

George Entz I agree with you, you should always know what the fight is. Chlorine can cause problems too if its dosage is too high. And depending in which area you are chlorine maybe already is present in your water lines. In some areas you have max of chlorine and so adding is not always possible. And chlorine and too much is bad especially for poultry and new research show as well for pigs. organic acid is not organic acid. often there is usage of lactic acid and acetic acid because of the taste and not all can formulate formic acid which is not strong smelling. and some of them are easier to buffer and transport regulations are low. so if you use the wring acid mix and to less than you can see that it feeds the bacteria. I think this is what happened with you. If you are using an acid in drinking water the pH have to be at least 4.5 or below. IN some areas farmers going now toward pH 2 and in poultry 3.8 as there nearly all bacterias cannot grow anymore and the start to pass away. Before the pH of 4.5 some stop only growing and some still can live and grow. So below 4.5 is always a nearly must if you use organic acid in drinking water. But in this discussion there is a lot of different things mixed. Encapsulate one in a drinking water cannot work to do the sanitizing. If they are used they will cough growth, as fat is a source of energy. So we need to separate this discussion if we are talking about drinking water and acid in the gut.

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February 2, 2021
Christoph Hutter

We can separate it but in reality we need to look at the whole picture. Water is important but what about feed ,Management, environment, economics?

I agree with a 3.8 PH when starting chicks, but we have consistently seen better ADG when we increase the PH (in the water) as the birds get older. The best results on Farms are with a PH of 5.5- 6 at slaughter age. Why??

I believe it's the buffering capacity of starter/grower diets. Here in Canada we use Calcium Carbonate for calcium source, and when one watches the DEBv then they also use Sodium Bicarb, 2 of the worst buffering ingredients. It will waste up to 30% of the acidifying potential of our feeds (we choose to acidify with feeds versus water) , that is why we see a positive result by acidifying our water in starter/grower but not so much in Finisher phases.

I have been looking for a NDF product, does ADDCON have suppliers in Canada?
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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
February 3, 2021
George Entz
We have not really a dealer in Canada
If you use NDF you can stopp using bicarbinate in the feed as NDF is a cl+ free source of Sodium too. and as the calcarbinate bufers mainly in the stomach there is not mcuh interaction in that as well.
Best regards Christoph
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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
February 3, 2021
Forget it depends not only on the ph you are using above 4.5 pH you have growth and it is not easy to stopp it depends in acid in taste and tongue feeling of the brids you see this really nice in gigs and in turkey and as well in poultry we now have build new generations which is doing respect in that with new ingredients who will althoug be negative to algae growth and where we could show that we influence birds over the drinking water too.
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February 3, 2021
Christoph Hutter

Yes I understand, that is why I'm interested in NDF, also looked into using Calcium Diformate but the economics weren't great on it.
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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
February 3, 2021
George Entz
Please contact me and we can discuss it.
As Canada is more crazy as you think

Best Regards Christoph
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April 23, 2021
Christoph Hutter,

Tried getting in contact with you via ADDCON website, left my email there but I suppose you never got it. So my email is entzgeorge20@gmail.com. Cheers.
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Christoph Hutter Christoph Hutter
Poultry farmer
April 25, 2021
George EntzSorry you are right it did not reach me.
I send you mail so you have now my contact data as well
Best Regards Christoph
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dan hofer dan hofer
Poultry farmer
February 2, 2021
It’s a feed additive
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dan hofer dan hofer
Poultry farmer
February 28, 2021
I advise all your poultry guys to invest in a waterline camera if the lines are clean that’s all the birds need a clean water all this PH is a pile of BS
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Frederic Paris Frederic Paris
Poultry farmer
February 28, 2021
dan hofer although it’s not the silver bullet, I found that birds droppings are more firms and overall litter quality improved with lowering my water’s PH to 3.8-4, and using also some organic acids blends in the feed. It’s a trick more in my sleeve to lower antibiotics use in my flocks. I don’t use BMD or any group 3 preventively since 4 years now with the help of acids.
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Fred Hoerr
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