Dr.George Stephenson
Novus International, headquartered in St. Charles, Missouri, creates animal nutrition solutions for livestock, poultry and aquaculture. Novus operations include corporate offices, research and development laboratories and manufacturing facilities in more than 35 countries, as well as smaller office...
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Mike Persia (Virginia Tech) discussed the positive effect of this enzyme on different doses and the environmental impact, during IPPE 2019 in Atlanta, USA.
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Vrajesh Jha, General Manager Marketing at Natural Remedies, outlines the main vision and values of Natural Remedies, the awards received and the R&D commitment, being a pioneer in the veterinary herbal healthcare industry, during VIV Asia 2019.
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The Impact of Feed Pelleting on Enzyme Thermostability In animal feed manufacturing, the process of pelleting is used to convert mash feed into compressed pellets. Pelleting provides several advantages, such as ease of handling, reduction of dust and waste and standard composition. The use of pelleted feed is also known to improve the feed conversion ratio (FCR) due to better digestibility and ab ...
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Mike Bedford Interesting stuff. Look forward to seeing the caecal sieve info! One thing I can say with some certainty is that the effect of xylanase (and perhaps NSPases in general) appears to be really highly generic i.e. the mechanisms of benefit, whatever they may be, do not seem to favour some nutrients more than others. If you think back to the analysis we published on ileal amino acid digest ...
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Interesting. It seems perfectly logical to me that if you change the substrate flow into the caudal gut (by increasing the rate of digestion of e.g. starch and protein or altering the solubility or tertiary structure of NSP) the microbiome will rapidly adapt to this new ecology and reorient itself accordingly. However, I find it a little difficult to accept that the major mechanism of a xylanase o ...
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Hi RafaelYes, exactly. I suspect we are simply releasing oligosaccharides in such quantities that they cannot be quantitatively fermented to produce the increments in VFAs we see in the caeca, rather they act as a signal to the caecal microbiome to start producing their own xylanases/cellulases to digest the xylan fibre more effectively. Have a look at our abstract in this year's PSA meeting (Bedf ...
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The biggest challenges facing the poultry industry today include disease prevention, particularly in the absence of antibiotics, and optimum nutrition, especially with regards to being able to incorporate novel/local ingredients into the diet. Interestingly these two are linked as much of the disease pressure that challenges current poultry production is enteric in its nature. Since the presence o ...
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Kannan Ganapathy (University of Liverpool) talked about the epidemiology, prevention and control of this disease, during Avicolas Porcinos 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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Dr. Andy Komarek (ANKOM) discussed methods for determining fiber content in DDG, among other topics, during the 22nd Annual Distillers Grains Symposium in Des Moines, Iowa.
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The more divalent cations in the diet the less soluble phytate becomes. This is especially true when drinking water pH is high and when phytate concentration is also high. In diets with high concentrations of e.g. Ca (from limestone, drinking water Ca, inorganic P sources, vegetable sources, V&M premix etc), high phytate concentration and more alkaline drinking water then the need for superdosin ...
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Location:Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Profile: Businessman / entrepreneur / shareholders
Occupation: Regional Technical Manager at Novus International