Assesing use of non-antibiotic growth promoters in chicken broiler production in Kenya

Published on: 04/22/2016
Author/s : Odede R.O, P. Mbugua1, Joyce Maina1 and Kuria J.K.

This study was done to investigate the viability of using organic acids as alternative replacement to antibiotics as in feed growth promoters and for use in managing broiler chickens in poultry farms around Nairobi in Kenya. The first part of this study was a survey and second part consisted of two feeding  trials. The survey was conducted in the environs of Nairobi to determine the extent of...

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Aditya Agarwal Aditya Agarwal
Executive Director
April 22, 2016
Dear Dr,

Can you share the scientific report of this study. We have developed a phytogenic growth promoter for 100% replacement of antibiotic used in the feed with excellent results in broilers & layers.

Would like to know how is the market developing in Kenya for the non-antibiotics growth promoters.

Thank you.
Aditya
Flavour trove, India
Reply
Dr. Odede R.O. Dr. Odede R.O.
Animal Nutritionist
April 23, 2016
Hello Aditya,
There is a growing demand for non antibiotic growth promoters as consumers are becoming increasingly aware and cautious of residues in food.
This work was done at the University of Nairobi in Kenya being my Msc project in Animal nutrition and feed science.
Kenya has over 38million chicken with 20% being commercially reared. The feed milling industry is widely expanding with the increase in commercial livestock farming. This is supported by the increasing human population currently over 40 million, increasing middle class and dwindling arable land size.
I would be interested in exploring the use of the phytogenic compounds in this region.
The scientific article will be share briefly.
Reply
Aditya Agarwal Aditya Agarwal
Executive Director
April 23, 2016
Dear Dr.

Thank you.

Can you please email me on info@flavourtrove.com, or contact me on my phone +91-9916093912 to discuss this at length.

Thank you
Reply
Odje Odje
Ingénieur Zootechnicien Volailles
April 23, 2016
Dr Odede : Thank you for the article. I 'm also interesting by phytogenic growth promoter
Dr Aditya ; can you send me e mail about phytogenic products (e mail : eodje@biodevas.fr)
Reply
Aditya Agarwal Aditya Agarwal
Executive Director
April 23, 2016
Dear Odje,

Thank you for the interest. I'll send you the details shortly.

Best regards.

Aditya
Reply
Sataluri Satagopa Raja Ayyangar Sataluri Satagopa Raja Ayyangar
B .Sc ( Mathematics , Physics and Chemistry ) ; P G Diploma in Environmental Studies ; P G Diploma in Industrial Pollution Management ; Industrial Chemistry ( B I E T )
April 23, 2016
This is a good step taken as synthetic antibiotics are causing danger to poultry and the end user .Every country have their own phyto products depending upon natural environment .Lot of inputs are to be searched
and open to public for the healthy environment.
Reply
Omolade Oladele Omolade Oladele
DVM, MVSc, Ph.D
April 24, 2016
Kindly send me the full article on lade.oladele@gmail.com
Thanks.
Reply
Muhammad Salman Akram Muhammad Salman Akram
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
April 24, 2016
Interested plz send detail as salmanakram3030@gmail.com
Reply
April 25, 2016
Nice article, your country has great heritage of herbs that you can investigate, as you know plant extracts contains several active materials(carvacrol, thymol, ...) as alkaloids, flavonoids, essential oils, resins and other of various pharmacological activities as antimicrobials, prebiotics, immunomodulators, and so on, I think you man need to pharmacologist to help you extracting the active ingredients in each plant and I send you this link of approved ingredients from plant extract in Europe with different activiteies
http://www.potravinari.sk/files/Tvrdenia-stakeholder_list__3rd_series_of_Art_13_health_claims.pdf
Reply
Nguyen Phuong Nguyen Phuong
Agricultural Engineer
April 25, 2016
please send me the full article on phuong200491@gmail.com

Thank you so much.
Reply
P.a. Cyril Mascreen P.a. Cyril Mascreen
Marketing Manager
April 25, 2016
Dear Doc,

You can using try Probiotics along with Herbal Extracts viz Curcumin, Allicin from Turmeric & Garlic along with immune booster like Phylanthus Emblica & Digestives like Ginger and Pepper. Probiotics in combination with Herbal Extracts are reputed to give very good results.
Reply
Nadir Alloui Nadir Alloui
Veterinary Doctor
April 25, 2016
Dear Dr Odede

Please check this website for articles on phytogenics :

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Nadir_Alloui/stats

Pr Nadir Alloui
DVM - Ph D
Veterinary Institute, University of Batna, Algeria
Reply
April 26, 2016
Dear gentlemen,

I would like to contribute with some experience we have gathered with non-antibiotic performance enhancers around the globe.
There is strong interest from the feed industry and Europe has 10 years experience in using such products.
Acidifiers (organic acids) are standard in most non-ruminant diets to reduce pH and buffering capacity and to control bacteria (esp. Gram-).
Probiotics are frequently used in the chick starter phase to establish a beneficial microbiota.
Plant extracts are used in all stages of production, but products and effects differ very much.
The majority of commercial plant extracts are based on essential oils. Key issues are standardization and stability. Essential oils are volatile, hence they lose efficacy over storage time and particularly during pelleting or extrusion. Furthermore, they influence smell and taste of the feed. Usually we do not see problems with that in chickens, but in young calves strong herbal flavour sometimes depressed appetite as they are used to milk.

Here is an interesting link to a scientific paper:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25181450

It shows very well the efficacy of a specific plant extract made from Macleya cordata (Sangrovit) in chickens. Its mode of action is illustrated in comparison with antibiotics.
The active compounds of this extract are standardized, not volatile and do not influence smell of feeds.

Kind regards
Tobias
Reply
Zahid Rasool Zahid Rasool
Animal Nutritionist
April 26, 2016
This shows promising results as most of European poultry feed producers and in some Asian countries are getting out of AGP use in broilers. More and more studies are conducted to support probiotics and organic acids use in broiler feeds.

Great

Thanks
Zahid
Reply
April 27, 2016
Salinomycin sodium is used as a COCCIDIOSTAT. It is an ionophore. There is a debate regarding the use of ionophores coccidiostats in the broilers as it is a derivative of antibiotic. In the studies done in Kenya, was the dosage of Salinomycin sodium like a coccidiostat or as an antibiotic growth promoter?
It is a good approach to eliminate the use of Antibiotic Growth Promoters in the broiler production.
Reply
April 27, 2016
Pls send the full article to me at olasemi@yahoo.com. Thanks
Reply
Dr. Odede R.O. Dr. Odede R.O.
Animal Nutritionist
April 27, 2016
Salinomycin as a ionophore with antibacterial and anticoccidial effects on some gram positive bacteria and a growth promoting effect on chickens.
"In 2009, Gupta et al. (1) announced in the journal Cell that salinomycin (Figure 1), one of the antibiotics currently used in veterinary medicine, is a 100 times more effective killer of breast cancer stem-like cells than Taxol (paclitaxel) (Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ, USA), a commonly used breast cancer chemotherapeutic drug. This study was very interesting and time-consuming, because scientists had to screen in detail a library of 16 000 natural and commercial chemical compounds for their ability to kill drug-resistant stem-like breast cancer cells (and other cancer cells). They found that only a small subset, including salinomycin, targeted cancer stem cells (CSCs) responsible for metastasis and relapse."
It is the latest oncogenic drug.
Misuse of this molecule thus could have far reaching consequences for humans.

The use of salinomycin controls coccidiosis and bacterial infections in poultry leading to the observed improvement in chicken performance.
Thank you.
Regards,
Dr. Odede R.O.


Reply
Dr. Odede R.O. Dr. Odede R.O.
Animal Nutritionist
April 27, 2016
Promotion of use of non antibiotic growth promoters should be encouraged to reserve antibiotics only for treatment of diseases to prevent development of resistance in humans.
A lot of awareness creation among extension staff, feed millers, policy makers and farmers is requisite for wider adoption of these safe alternatives.
Regards,
Dr. Odede
Reply
April 27, 2016
Nice job, Dr. Odede!
Pls send the full article to me at ehizperez@gmail.com. Thanks
Reply
Athangudi Venugopalan Athangudi Venugopalan
Animal Health Technologist
April 27, 2016
use of non antibiotic growth promoters is a good move in right direction. garlick is good antibiotic. vancomycin is the powerfull antibiotic. antibiotic prepared from garlick is given to persons not responding to vanco mycin
addition of chlorine dioxide in water results in body weight increase 10 percent. entero bacteria family members are are in activating carbapenem group of antibiotics as s such hygiene farm to fork is need of the hour
venugopalan
28-4-16
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