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Article published the May 12, 2017
Introduction The genus Brachyspira includes seven officially named and several unofficially named species of anaerobic spirochaetes that colonize the large intestine of mammals and birds [1]. The three most commonly reported pathogenic species are Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the agent of swine dysentery, Brachyspira intermedia, a pathogen mainly of adult chickens, and Brachyspira pilosicoli, the ...
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Article published the February 6, 2017
Introduction The Intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the etiological agent of swine dysentery (SD)—a severe mucohemorrhagic colitis of pigs [1] Despite the economic importance of SD and the need to control the disease, knowledge is lacking about metabolic and other adaptations that have allowed the spirochete to successfully colonize the complex and potentially hostile envir ...
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Article published the January 27, 2017
Introduction Bacteria of the genus Brachyspira are anaerobic intestinal spirochaetes that can cause diarrhoea and mortality in pigs and other species. This genus comprises seven officially named species and several provisionally named species. Six of these can be found in the porcine large intestine, and currently three are considered to be enteropathogenic to the pig [1]. The most important is B ...
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Article published the November 25, 2016
Introduction The intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the classical causative agent of swine dysentery (SD), a disease typically associated with severe colitis and bloody mucoid diarrhoea mainly seen in grower and finisher pigs [1]. Two related species, Brachyspira suanatina and “Brachyspira hampsonii”, also have been shown to occur in pigs and to cause SD on occasion ...
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Article published the September 8, 2014
The name “Brachyspiral colitis” recently was introduced into the literature on swine diseases to describe the situation where colitis, diarrhea and/or dysentery occur in pigs infected with one or more pathogenic Brachyspira species (Hampson, 2012). The term was created to emphasise an increasing understanding of the diversity of anaerobic intestinal spirochetes in the genus Brachyspira ...
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Professor David Hampson, BVetMed, PhD, DSc, FASM, FAAM, FRCPath, FRCVS is Dean of the School of Veterinary and Life Sciences – but before that he was the Dean of the former School of Veterinary and Biomedical Science. In his role as Dean he is committed to supporting and enhancing the established excellence in research and teaching that is a hall-mark of our School. His own research mainly has focused on intestinal spirochaetes of the genus Brachyspira. Currently He is working on developing new vaccines and diagnostic tests for these bacteria for use in controlling disease in pigs and poultry.
Location:Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Profile: Academic / scientific
Occupation: Dean of School and Professor of Veterinary Microbiology
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