Vegetable proteins can replace animal proteins

Published on: 01/24/2020
Author/s : IAZ Joaquin A. Paulino / Animal Nutrition Consultant, Precision Animal Nutrition.

  What are the vegetable proteins? • Soy Protein 65% • Fermented soybean meal 54% • Extruded and micronized soybean meal 48% • Extruded whole Soy meal soy 36% • Potato protein 80% • Algae meal 55%   Animal protein is a feed ingredient of high quality and easily digestible, which is used as a supplement to diets for young animals. However, over...

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Khaled Fadlallah Khaled Fadlallah
Bsc in veterinary medicine
January 24, 2020
very good activities
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February 5, 2020
Good summary article, but take care, grain and soya products also have a host of problems like the meat products cited. I have fed broilers no meat product diets for 20 years and there are problems with these grain, soybean meal, canola meal, pea protein, isolated protein sources, millet and sorghum based diets.
Excellent nutrition is required for successful animal production with either type of diet.
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March 11, 2020
There are important differences in amino acid composition between animal- and plant-source proteins. In addition, animal-source feeds contain important nutrients that are absent from plant-source feeds. Dr. Peng Li (North American Renderers Association, VA, USA) and I just published the following Open-Access paper regarding the composition of amino acids and nitrogenous nutrients in feedstuffs for animal feeding. The link to the paper is as follows:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00726-020-02833-4



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Edwin T Moran Edwin T Moran
Animal Nutritionist
February 7, 2020

Generally, a good review, as Dave indicated. Vegetable source proteins have their own “problems” as do animal sources. Bear in mind the “ease” of using one or the other exclusively depends on the animal. Herbivores employ a rumen or cecum with microbes doing the “work” to provide a “balanced” protein. Carnivores have adapted to optimize use of flesh, I.e. animal proteins. We largely need to provide for “omnivores”, which have the capacity to do well with the combination, but not as well when confronted with the exclusive use of one or the other. A meaningful part of this revolves around the NEAA and less so the EAA. Cystine, glycine, serine and proline can be readily accommodated by selective sourcing of animal products whereas vegetable products are typically very low by comparison. The aforementioned AA play a big role in GIT mucus formation, and their “immediate” access from the lumen enables ready response to surface “aggravations.” They can be synthesized but delay has its repercussion on relative productivity. There is no question that vegetable source dietary proteins can entirely replace animal products, but do not expect to readily impose a concurrent decrease in CP without some background “noise.”

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February 8, 2020

Very good topic, but before accepting this idea generally we have to adopt the idea of synthetic amino acid fortification of diet to compensate for limiting amino acids. though in poultry we have adopted all plant-based diet and it seems very well, but still we need more research to determine why fishmeal based diets perform better than fish meal free diet. Is this related to higher amino acid digestibility in fishmeal based diet compared to all plant-based or it does related to higher Se or better composition of fatty acid profile? However, it is clear that without animal protein source it is still possible to have a poultry industry, but without soybean which is god's gift to the animal industry, it would be very hard to maintain current poultry and swine industry.

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John Kaijage John Kaijage
PhD in Tropical Animal Production
February 9, 2020

Some few vegetable proteins can replace animal proteins. The most common limitation of vegetable proteins is lack of amino acid profile of essential amino acids, such as lysine and methionine.

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 9, 2020

Undoubtedly, the digestibility of amino acids in animal protein sources is better than that of plant origin and if they are poorly processed even more but the use of exogenous enzymes especially protease and good processing help a lot and, if applied, glucanases and mannanases are excellent.

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 9, 2020

I have been replacing fish meal, animal plasma and blood meal in piglet preinitiators for three years with a 65% soy protein and the results are excellent and at the lowest cost. I am now trying to replace the whey with molasses cane using an equivalent of 50 sucrose to lactose in molasses.

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DARE AKINNIYI LAWRENCE DARE AKINNIYI LAWRENCE
Ph.D. Animal science.
February 12, 2020

Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Results can be excellent. This is relative, but is the result at par with or efficiently better than using animal protein?

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Yong Kyu Kim Yong Kyu Kim
Industrial Engineer
March 11, 2020
Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua email :cflintkim@gmail.com
information. email thank
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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 12, 2020

Dear Dare the results are similar or better than the results using animal protein I can share the diets with the permission of Carlos Avilan from Engormix and I invite you to the Dominican Republic to see and measure the parameters.

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Carlos Avilan Carlos Avilan
Community Manager
February 12, 2020

Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Sure, Dr. Paulino, feel free to share here the diets and thank you for your contributions to these conversations.

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DARE AKINNIYI LAWRENCE DARE AKINNIYI LAWRENCE
Ph.D. Animal science.
February 13, 2020
Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Thank you for your good response.
Processing the plant protein for optimal biological efficiency is a problem in my country Nigeria.
I want to partner with you to repeat this study in Nigeria, particularly for poultry.
Please, I need your thoughts on this.
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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 12, 2020

We are contemplating replacing the whey with molasses and sugar cane to produce a 100% vegetable diet.

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 13, 2020

Piglet pre-starter diets

 

Results CMAR Farm

Reply
February 12, 2020
Vegetable proteins may replace animal proteins in diet formulations, but the question is "Why?".
See http://PeerJ.com/articles/2100/ for a full discussion of the efficiency of land use for meeting protein needs for humans: the same strictures apply to monogastrics. It is clear from that analysis that monogastrics feed humans their protein needs much less effectively than dairy from arable land. Surprisingly, dairy is a better landuse that plant-based foods too. Since we feed pigs and poultry plant-based diets to produce human food, our industries have to address this critical impact on food security, before trying to create vegan diets for pig or poultry lifestages.

Note that it is not just land use that gives dairy its advantage. It takes only third as much water to meet human essential amino acid needs as does wheat or soya, and loses much less nitrogen to the ground water or atmosphere, provided the best management practices are employed. When the positive impacts on human nitrogen excretion are factored in, dairy-based diets lead to much lower GHG emissions than do vegan diets. Dairy sets the benchmark for global food security, and this is the challenge pork and poultry must address.
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Ram Singh Ram Singh
Ph.D (Animal Nutrition)
February 13, 2020
There are reports in literature indicating replacement of animal protein with vegetable protein, however, extensive studies are required for better conclusion.
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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 13, 2020

The engineer Atuey Martínez has more than three years using the diets -presented here with the help from Carlos from Engormix- and is very happy with the results and as I inform you we are testing to replace the whey with the cane molasses and elaborate 100% vegetable diets

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 13, 2020
Thank you very much Carlos Avilan
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February 13, 2020
When we formulate swine and poultry diets, we need to consider all proteinogenic amino acids, including those that are synthesized by the animals. Sole consideration of so-called “nutritionally essential amino acids” is not good for optimizing the health or productivity of swine and poultry.
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OGUNWOLE, OLUGBENGA OGUNWOLE, OLUGBENGA
BSc Hons MSc PhD
February 20, 2020

In Nigeria here, we have successfully fed breeding, broiler and laying chickens with the processed leaf. Particularly, the leaf meal have been the partial or the main source of vitamin-mineral for the stocks. Leaf meal as sources of protein and fibre for pigs and poultry have been achieved too. You are free to explore our modest contributions here in Ibadan Varsity and other institutions here in Nigeria for these.

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
February 20, 2020

Forage legume leaf meal and other high-protein plants are good sources of vegetal proteins and I experimented in poultry and pigs with good results.

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Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua Joaquin Armando Paulino Paniagua
Agro Engineer Zootechnist
March 12, 2020

Those diets that Carlos Avilan presented in the forum have been used for more than three years and the results are excellent and the piglets are in good health and without any deficiencies. We only use dairy whey and soy protein and soy bean meal and corn and fortify with synthetic amino acids.

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Ranganathan Ranganathan
International Trade COACH
March 18, 2020

Ahmad Karimi Rightly said.... Fatty acid profile does the magic for essential nutritional supplementation.

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Dr Valeriy Kryukov Dr Valeriy Kryukov
Doctor in Biological Sciences
April 16, 2020
Dear sir
How do people eat? I ate one or the other of what is available or what I like. If we met our nutritional needs based on scientific data, we would probably be healthier and live longer.
Scientific medical literature is hundreds or thousands of times poorer than publications on the effects of nutrients on animals. Do not like themselves!
Why should there be a problem of replacing animal protein with plant protein?
In humans, this problem is solved on an emotional level.
We must provide animals with the necessary set of individual nutrients (available!!!) according to your needs.
What difference does it make where the amino acids appear in the intestines, for example, after digesting feed? From plant or animal feed or synthetic additives?

The problem is that it is necessary to develop recipes for compound feeds based on the content of available nutrients (amino acids, for example) in the raw material.
Based on this, the main part of the efforts of science should be directed to the study of the properties of raw materials. It should be taken into account that animal feed has fewer anti-nutritional factors and higher availability of nutrients. It is necessary to develop techniques that exclude the actions of anti-nutritional factors and take into account the true availability of nutrients and plant feeds. This will eliminate the question: plant or animal feed.
I can give you an example: in Russia there are several broiler poultry farms that grow 6 -8 million broilers per year and do not use animal feed, but get the recommended mass of cross Ross broilers 308. Experiments with the inclusion of 3 - 5% fish meal in feed did not increase productivity.
Success has been achieved as a result of good development of feed recipes
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