Rodent Control

Rodent Control in Livestock and Poultry Facilities

Published on: 08/22/2012
Author/s : Brian Lang, Dairy Cattle Production Systems Specialist, OMAFRA, Woodstock.
This Factsheet was originally authored by G.A. Surgeoner, Professor, University of Guelph, and revised by Betty Summerhayes, Product Development Specialist, OMAFRA, Guelph, and Brian Lang, Dairy Cattle Production Systems Specialist, OMAFRA, Woodstock. This article replaces OMAFRA Factsheet Rodent Control in Livestock and Poultry FacilitiesOrder No. 07-009. Rats and mice have long been...
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Nadir Alloui Nadir Alloui
Veterinary Doctor
August 22, 2012

Dear Brian Lang

Thank you for the article. Generally farmers do not give importance to the fight against rodent. As you said, these rodents can cause sometimes economic losses, due in part to the destruction of feed, livestock equipment and disease transmission

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August 23, 2012
Dear Sir,

Thanks to given the wonderful article about Rodents.
I request you to give the details about the PVC bait station

Regards,
Neethiraja A
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Dr. B. Barman Dr. B. Barman
M.V.Sc in Vety Microbilogy, NET
August 23, 2012

Thanks to Brain Lang for such a nice, elaborative and informative article.
This article will definately help to manage the rodent problems and to eradicate the salmonella from the farm

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August 23, 2012
This article is very insightive, elaborate and nice. Kudos to Barin Lang. Hat tip's
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Arshaq Ramzee Arshaq Ramzee
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
August 23, 2012
Rats and mice are not easy to control but author discussed all the possible ways to control this menace. A very good article with all possible information you should need to eliminate these pests.
Reply
Safdar Javed Safdar Javed
Veterinary Doctor
August 24, 2012

very good article about rodent control, common problem at every farm

Reply
Hassan-sadeghi Hassan-sadeghi
Veterinary Doctor
August 25, 2012

I am so glad to read your text about rodent control, but the dimention of pipe line( 5 cm) to control of rodent is enougth or we should select larger type?
kind regards

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Norman Pearson Norman Pearson
Veterinary Doctor
August 26, 2012
As a vet I deal with the unfortunate poisonings of dogs that gain access to these poisons. The bait station is a wonderful solution and ask if I may copy the diagram to my client farmers? Regards,
Norman Pearson, Swellendam, South Africa
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Muhammad Akhtar Naseem Muhammad Akhtar Naseem
Animal Nutritionist
August 29, 2012

Article about rodent control  is very good and helps farmer and feed millers to get away with the problems of rodents and mouse because its a common problem and mouse and rats mostly damage electric wirings in mill.

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August 31, 2012

Dear Brian,
Rodents are common problem in livestock,Least care was taken until they establish.Bait them.... No prob....hazard.... prob.....bait...prob.. useless bait...,Neglect....Oop health hazard.How to eliminate them ? Bait,Trap,Construction Methods..so on but your answer was simple and practicle Thanks for the valuble hints ant also low cost bait trap.

Nihal Albecket National Livestock Development Board Sri Lanka.

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Waqar Waqar
CEO
August 31, 2012
08/01/2012
There is yet another method to control rodents is by using high voltage electric shocker similar to that which is used for anti perching in layer houses on floors and on drinker lines.The voltage generally used is 600-800 volts but current is low so the energy value in joules is low and is not fatal to humans but a good barrier for rodents around feed stores and near entry doors of poultry houses. A number of dry wooden strips measuring 4 inch wide 3 feet long and 3/4 inch thick are used. On these strips two suitable thick wires are nailed along the length in parallel and at a separating distance of 3 inch.On each side of this pair of wire is connected to shoe /socket pair male/female easily available at electric shop.This is to connect these wires and wooden srips close together to make long lengths and make bends as required.At the end of the whole length connect the shocker and leave the other end as such similar to anti perching in layer house.Set this length linear or curvilinear around feeds and around entry doors.Once shocked rodent will never come there again due to memoririzing danger there.

Waqar Ahmad The Automation Company Rawalpindi Pakistan
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Waqar Waqar
CEO
September 4, 2012
Further to my above posting I would love to seek comments of Mr Brian Lang and others on the shocker incorporated barrier
Reply
Andrea Brook Andrea Brook
Animal Health Technologist
December 14, 2015
http://www.creative-animodel.com/Animal-Model-Development/Animal-Models-of-Disease.html
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