Modern Dietary Approach to Prevent Enteric Disorders in Commercial Poultry Production

Published on: 02/17/2009
Author/s : Dr S. Chandrasekar - Manager-Technical Services (Poultry Products Group), Neospark Drugs and Chemicals Private Limited

With the ever increasing need for animal protein sources for human consumption, the poultry industry always coped up to meet the needs at an affordable manner. The conditions in developing countries for the production of either broiler or table egg may not be entirely free of unseen losses. The following article will review briefly about such losses by gut disorders and the approaches to avoid the...

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Parminder Singh Chawla Parminder Singh Chawla
Animal Nutritionist
February 17, 2009
Poultry birds are subjected to different forms of probiotics for the last 20 years. What was modern in this article. Thanks.
Reply
February 17, 2009
Congratulations. Thank you for an informative article. In the field, we experience the benefits of probiotics usage with this optimum concentration of 1000 billion per gram, as reduction in mortality, higher production, higher body weight, improved FCR, as brief, healthy birds... wealthy farmers.

Keep continue it.
Reply
February 17, 2009
This is to notify Dr Parminder Singh Chawla who has noted a valuable comment about the probiotics are being used in poultry for the past 20 years and this may not be a modern information. Yes I agree with him, but here we are not talking about the probiotics, we are more concerned about the bacterial population in different places of gut and the optimal concentration of probiotics to be supplemented from Zero hour to through out the cropping period. In these aspects the author tried to provide much information to the industry, especially farming communities to chose a better and optimally concentrated product for their birds. For further information the visitors requested visit Neospark website.
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Munawar Ali Munawar Ali
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
February 17, 2009
Dear Sir

Excellent article. This is the need of time. We cannot get maximum potential from birds without gut health. Continue to write these kind of articles.

Regards,

Dr. Munawar Ali
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February 17, 2009
I want a method on how formulate a ration for layer.
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February 17, 2009
Dear sir,
we use this program in Egypt and have good performance.
Thanks for the notification.
Reply
Arshaq Ramzee Arshaq Ramzee
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
February 18, 2009
I agree with Mr. Chawla that there is nothing new in the approach for the use of Non-AGP in diet. Industry is using these kinds of products with mixed results and most of them are inconclusive. With high density of poultry birds in one area increases the chance of multiple bacterial and viral infections that could only be cured with the use of antibiotics. In this situation, if we are using probiotic as growth promoter then it will result in failure of probiotic. Wise thing is that if your are using probiotic in the feed and use of antibiotic at theraputic level is needed then probiotic should be discontinued immediately and could only be re started after the antibiotic therapy is over.

We need more research in this approach as one can observe that AGPs are still on top and have a market share of more than 80%. Some multinational companies, which have a strong research base, are working on this approach and as far as my informatiion is concerned, we need to look into a new product launched by Kemin USA, Clostat.
Reply
Dr. K.S. Arora Dr. K.S. Arora
Veterinary Doctor
February 18, 2009
This is an excellent article and gives some useful practical information. Use of probiotics for this purpose has given inconsistent results during last few years in poultry. In my view this may be attributed to stability of various preparations in feed and water rather than failure of the practice per se.
Reply
Ganesh Kumar Dahal Ganesh Kumar Dahal
Managing Director MDH Pharmaceuticals Pvt.Ltd.
March 10, 2009
Potential of birds could only be highlited if gut health is better. Non-AGP like probiotic products with a good Acidifier which can acidify GI track content of poultry from Crop to Cloaca will definely give better profit to farmers.

In the interest of public health, indiscriminate use of antibiotic therapy and AGP in poultry diet should be discouraged.
Reply
March 10, 2009
Its in quite good article. Author has coverd most of areas pertaining to gut health and use of probiotics.
Thru' our experience, we would like to put farward that if we provide quality chicks, efficent brooding, temp, space, medicated water, proper ventilation and good feed made out of healthy raw materials, supplement with probiotic, the excellent results can be seen in terms of body wt, lower FCR and mimimum mortality.
Reply
Dr.Iftikhar Ahmad Mashhadi Dr.Iftikhar Ahmad Mashhadi
Animal Nutritionist
March 10, 2009
The said article by Dr. S. Chandrasekar is a good informative tool that is helpful and the present need for poultry production, but for probiotics to be used as immunopotentiators, as many studies have suggested, there remain a number of questions that must be answered.
What are the most active strains and do they have the potential to be pathogenic?
What is the maximum dose?
When and how should the probiotic be delivered?
In my opinion, the easiest option is an in-feed delivery system.
Reply
Stephen Adejoro Dr Stephen Adejoro Dr
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
April 29, 2009
Please, we need to see clinical trials with cost benefit effect of the use of probiotic in comparison with antibiotics for result output.
I think companies selling probiotic should report on this kind of trials.
African projects want to see this kind of practical empiric information in other to make commitment decision on reversal from antibiotics to probiotics.
PROBIOTIC SELLERS SHOULD SPONSOR THIS KIND OF EXPERIMENTAL TRIALS IN AFRICA AND THE OUTCOME OF SUCH RESULTS IF POSITIVE IN FAVOUR of probiotics will motivate poultry farmers in Africa to shift loyalty to the use of probiotics.
Otherwise most farmers in Africa may not relax their commitment to the use of synthetic antibiotics.

Adejoro
Reply
April 29, 2009
Dear Sirs,.

I have been following this discussion about this excellent article and I wanted to seize the opportunity to inform that the probiotics ECOBIOL and ECOBIOL PLUS, produced by NOREL&NATURE, are officially registered in European Union.

ECOBIOL is a sporulated, heat-resistant stable Bacillus originating from a non-emetic strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

ECOBIOL is a microorganism that produces huge quantity of enzymes (higher than Lactobacillus) and can set them free in vitro in the culture media and in vivo in the animal gut once it germinates. This fact allows the animals to obtain a higher degradability of the nutrients in the feed.

ECOBIOL produces protease and amylase enzymes. The degradation of starch and protein are therefore easily detectable in Agar-Starch and Agar-Gelatine mediums. These enzymatic activities are very important after weaning in the feed, the protein source is from vegetable origin, instead of casein coming from sow’s milk, and the animal gastrointestinal tract has to adapt to the new situation. The probiotic helps to this transition.

Besides, ECOBIOL is able to produce another type of extracellular enzymes like cellulases and xylanases.

ECOBIOL enhances lactic acid production, causing a severe in Intestine pH, which affects pathogenic bacteria and helps the pepsin activation.

ECOBIOL is also tolerant to several antibiotics such as Colistin, Amoxicillin, Oxytetracycline, Sulfamide, Tiamuline, Neomycin, Zinc Bacitracin or Avilamycine.

Finally, ECOBIOL can produce bacteriocins that help in controlling Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli or Salmonella. In vivo trials on broilers have shown that ECOBIOL helps controlling salmonella infection by reducing the Salmonella shedding in faeces as well as salmonella infection level at crop, caecum and liver. It has, therefore, a positive effect on bird health by preventing Salmonella colonization at both intestinal and systemic phases.

For further information do not hesitate to contact me.
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Dr. Eric Ng Dr. Eric Ng
Technical Manager
April 30, 2009
The hatcheries operator should be aware of this condition and take a very first move to inoculating probiotics to their hatched chicks.

Reply
Saadat Changezi Saadat Changezi
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
April 30, 2009
The use of probiotics in poultry has proved its importance, I understand this could be one of the different means to minimize the use of antibiotics in poultry birds.
All the poultry production concerns should take initiatives to discourage or at least minimize the use of antibiotics by using probiotics and save the end consumers and the eco system.

Dr. Saadat Ali Changezi
Reply
June 17, 2009

Really informative article.

Reply
Dr Pooja Bhardwaj Dr Pooja Bhardwaj
M.V.Sc (Pharmacology & Toxicology)
Natural Remedies Pvt. Ltd Natural Remedies Pvt. Ltd
Karnataka, India
August 10, 2017
Nice article Dr. I just want to know if any study has been done so far to establish a solid data file on gut ecosystem in poultry (stage wise)
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