Embryonic Mortality in Breeders

Forum: Fertility and Embryonic Mortality in Breeders

Published on: 11/18/2008
Author/s : Keith Bramwell, Extension Reproductive Physiologist - AVIAN Advice newsletter, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service
Broiler breeder fertility is, somewhat indirectly, of utmost importance to the overall success of the poultry industry. Through many years of intense genetic selection and improved nutritional management, there has been a steady and rapid increase in the growth rate of broilers produced for the meat market. A natural result of this is that the present day breeders also have the propensity for extr...
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November 18, 2008

It was really an interesting article to know more about the fertilization process in poultry. The trial analysis report on the sperm quality and sperm numbers influence on the fertility % and early embryonic mortality % is clearly explaining the importance of insemination of hens with correct sperm dosage at regular intervals to get more number of chicks per hen and quality chicks. So, I am sure the perivitalline sperm hole assay will be a very useful tool to quantitatively analyse the fertility % i.e. breeding performance of males and females in broiler breeding flocks.

Dr.G.Venkatesh, M.V.Sc.,
Business development Manager
Alltech Biotechnology Pvt Ltd,
Bangalore, India

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Stewart MacLean Stewart MacLean
Marketing Manager
December 5, 2008

Very interesting article. I'd like to add an observation that breeder management, particularly the management of the maturity levels of the males and females must be carefully monitored. When males are not mature and mating before egg production starts, the fertility seldom reaches satisfactory levels. In nature, in the Spring, before the wild birds lay their eggs, they mate. It appears that pullets should be mating before starting egg production and this requires careful attention particularly to male maturity rates.

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Arshaq Ramzee Arshaq Ramzee
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
December 6, 2008

Practical aspect of this interesting and very elaborative article, in my opinion is, an introduction of a new management tool: Why not we rear a flock of breeder males after 25 weeks of placement of a breeder flock and intrduce the 25 weeks younger males to the flock approximately just before 50 weeks, and remove the old males to improve frequency of mating? My question to author is that above suggestion has any weight to consider for future research?

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December 6, 2008

As flocks ages mating frequency decreases, fertility decreases, and embryonic mortality increases. This can be avoided by spiking younger male at the age of 40th week. Shell quality can be improved by controlling the egg size and increasing Ca in feed. The egg storage at farm plays an important role in hatchability, embryonic mortality, much emphasis should be given at farm while storage before despatching eggs to hatchery. Transportation of these eggs also a factor which can minimize hatchability.

Reply
ibrahim ahmed ibrahim ahmed
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
February 14, 2009

Dear sir,

Thank you for your nice article. As flocks ages mating frequency decreases, fertility decreases, and embryonic mortality increases. This can be avoided by nutritional management as addition of essential fatty acids as omega 3 and/or omega 6, or by spiking younger male at the age of 40th week. Shell quality can be improved by controlling the egg size and increasing Ca in feed and pay attention to available phosphorous. The egg storage at farm plays an important role in hatchability, embryonic mortality, much emphasis should be given at farm while storage before despatching eggs to hatchery. Transportation of these eggs also a factor which can minimize hatchability. Some flock diseases can affect the fertility and hatchability, also seasonal and climate conditions.

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June 18, 2009
A vital point that is missing is the importance of adequate and a balanced nutrition via the feed. As we know, the first bodily system to shut down in times of stress, or when there is nutrient deficiency or imbalance, happens to be the reproductive system, which to an animal in the wild, is considered non-vital for survival of the individual animal.

Various natural feed additives may be used to increase efficient feed utilisation and nutrient uptake from the feed. One of these is oregano essential oil. According to observations by Chiong, S.T. (2000), oregano essential oil improves digestion and absorption of nutrients in the intestinal tract, and hence the nutrients in the feed can be fully utilised. Apart from better egg shell quality, farmers and field veterinarians also observed drier faeces from the breeder hens, which resolved problems of wet pings. This effect contributes to lowering the percentage of egg contamination, infection and chick mortality.

Apart from nutritional aspects, oregano essential oil also controls and prevents important intestinal diseases that could affect breeder egg production, fertility and hatchability.
Reply
Ganesh Kumar Dahal Ganesh Kumar Dahal
Managing Director MDH Pharmaceuticals Pvt.Ltd.
June 19, 2009
The article is very good. Post Comments discussed by Mr.S.MacLean, Dr.Ramzee, Dr. Rehman could be taken up for further research.
Congratulation !!
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June 24, 2009
It was really an interesting article to know more about the fertilization process in poultry.
Reply
Chen Chen
Poultry farmer
January 24, 2010
This article is very interesting about poultry breeder,its very useful for poultry farmer.
Reply
April 28, 2010
Dear sir,

The article is good and very useful to understand about the fertilization process in hen.

Regards,
A.Neethiraja
Coimbatore
Reply
May 28, 2010
Thanks Its is a really an interesting article to know more about the fertilization process in poultry. & Comment by Dr. A.Rehman also considerable.

Regards!
Dr. Anjum
Reply
Dr Kamran Dr Kamran
Agricultural Engineer
August 18, 2010

dear sir,
good article but if it had been correlated with actual farm conditions it would have been much better.
normally breeder companies do their best in preparation of feed, disease prevention, egg storage and egg transportation. now the problem is that if we don,t have younger males what should we do. i think here comes male management. if we remove heavier males making them leaner and again introducing them in the sheds if it does not increase fertility it will maintain fertility for quite considerable time. i have done it with some success. waiting for every ones opinion.

Reply
Chandana Dolawatta Chandana Dolawatta
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
June 30, 2012

Dear sir,
This article was very interesting. If we remove 8% of over weight(over 5Kg) males from the males at 35wks and introdused average weight new males can it affect to hatcherbility and how long will it take to recover?

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