Avian Urolithiasis (Gout)

Forum about Avian Urolithiasis (Gout)

Published on: 05/27/2009
Author/s : Dr. M.T.Banday, Dr. Mukesh Bhakt and Dr. Sheikh Adil Hamid - Srinagar, Kashmir, India
Today’s bird is genetically engineered for higher productivity. Selection of birds is based on production parameters. In the process, the health of the vital organs is ignored. This has resulted in increased incidence of metabolic disorders. The kidney is a vital organ of the bird with diverse metabolic and excretory function viz. maintaining the chemical composition of body fluids, removal ...
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Chandana Dolawatta Chandana Dolawatta
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
March 29, 2012

Very informative article about avian gout. Can high level of phosphate in drinking water leads to visceral gout ?
Due to nervous signs of ND can it cause visceral gout. Because they cannot drink water due to trammar

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Ghazal Hussain Ghazal Hussain
Microbiologist
October 30, 2013
Does hard water causes gout?
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July 10, 2015
I would like to know about the use of antibiotic in case of gout treatment.
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cherukuri choudary cherukuri choudary
Veterinary Doctor
October 15, 2015
In my opinion,gout generally occurs in layers ,due to mycotoxins.Hence,better to check the feedingredients for the presence of fungal contamination and replace such material with go0d,quality material and add ammonium chloride in feed at the rate of 2 kg per tonof feed for one week.Gout due to I.B is not common as in all farms vaccine schedule is strictly followed forthe disease.
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ogbu samuel oluwah ogbu samuel oluwah
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
October 26, 2015
very rich article. Does ammonium chloride have any other therapeutic use apart from being used as acidifier?
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Ramzan Ali Ramzan Ali
Doctor Of Veterinary Medicine
September 24, 2016
Dear Mridul kumar
What are the composition of libac-10?

Regards
DR. Ramzan Ali
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Wayne Miller Wayne Miller
Nurse
January 23, 2018
I am currently managing a Barnevelder hen with what I believe is visceral gout. The symptoms are acute in onset and there is a noted uraemic "odour" where there has been a collection of excreta on the feathers. I am trying a probiotic and have also used low dose cortisone as an oral preparation for the last three days. The bird is showing some improvement in strength however has not really improved in appetite.
Is there something else I should be doing to overcomke the disorder. I do have access to allopurinol (100 mg tablets) so could use this. There is also the other thought I had and that was to utilise a "sports electrolyte" mixture such as Hydralite.
I would be interested to know if I should be looking at something else?
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Fred Hoerr
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