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Participation in Forum on May 20, 2019
Oscar Briceño Unless something has changed in the last decade or so, you can't. I did my PhD in methionine for pigs, and had a whole section on methionine alternatives in my first chapter. It was hypothesized that as a methyl-donor, betaine could spare methionine (itself a major methyl donor). In vitro liver homogenate trials showed some potential. However, when tested in vivo, my recollection is ...
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This member gave a presentation on February 12, 2019
At the following event:
IPPE - International Production & Processing Expo 2019
This member gave a presentation on February 11, 2019
At the following event:
IPPE - International Production & Processing Expo 2019
This member gave a presentation on February 11, 2019
At the following event:
IPPE - International Production & Processing Expo 2019
Participation in Forum on August 13, 2018
Kasame Trakullerswilai Chlorine dioxide efficacy will depend on the pH of the water. As long as the pH is sufficiently low "Yes" continuous chlorination can be helpful.HMTBa is has a good pKa for water acidification (3.6), but it is a rather large molecule (150 g/mol) so the dose would need to be quite high relative to an acid with a similar pKa such as formic (pKa 3.77 and 46 g/mol).As for the ta ...
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Joshua Jendza likes the comment:
Joshua Jendza Field trials using an organic acid blend of propionic, acetic and benzoic acids administered the first two weeks and the last week of the growout have shown a significant impact on reducing Salmonella at processing (bird washes). Organic acids used at the "proper" dose early and late in the growout addresses early colonization and late recontamination. What you're doing is reducing b ...
Joshua Jendza likes the comment:
Dear Dr. Fuad, organic acid + inorganic acid (simply, water acidifier) can a little bit decrease pH of water, to prevent Salmonella population. But to remove biofilm, it is necessary to use more stronger acid plus hydrogen peroxide. This is waterpipe cleaning procedure. After these cleaning, necessary to wash pipes by fresh water and than continue to use organic acids. Cleaning is necessary to per ...
Participation in Forum on July 16, 2018
Glenn Alfred S. Ferriol I think we can confirm that the salt used was Na-butyrate. A UGA student gave a presentation at the 2nd International Necrotic Enteritis Symposium last week. I believe that the student was from this lab, and he confirmed during the Q&A section after his presentation that they used Na-butyrate, despite referring to it as "butyric acid" in the abstract and throughout the pre ...
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Participation in Forum on July 3, 2018
Christoph Hutter This is a good point! Some of the organic acids can be used as an energy source at lower concentrations, or when used in isolation. This difference can even be seen at the same pH with some acids resulting in blooms and others not. It depends on the microorganisms having the molecular pathway to metabolize the acid. As you say, this is not seen for formic acids. And many blends ...
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Joshua Jendza likes the comment:
On top in acetic acid, you often can see that bacterias can grow.This is the same for Lactic acid if it is diluted some of this molecules can be used as energy to some bacteria or fungus or even Algae We see more and more of this growth in Europe in systems where it is used for a long term. If you have a good Formic product you will not see it.
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Location:Florham Park, New Jersey, United States
Profile: Academic / scientific
Occupation: Animal Nutritionist
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