Heat Detection in cows

Forum: The Importance of Heat Detection

Published on: 06/15/2011
Author/s : Rommel Ramos (National Account Training Specialist, Genex)
It´s simple - accurate heat detection programs lead to higher pregnancy rates. Higher pregnancy rates result in more pregnant cows, fewer days open and more profitability for the dairy. Having spent 11 years as the manager of a breeding team in Saudi Arabia and 14 years on different dairies (in Arizona and Oregon), I have seen firsthand the universality of good heat detection programs. Rega...
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June 15, 2011

It is really hard work and nice effort by the autrhor. We have many types of livestock farmers and they have their own specific business and targets. The farmers who have set up in peri urban area are only interested in milk production and least interested in breeding. However those who are really livestock breeders this article will be of great use to them to have maximum benifit from breeding and will avail the chance of breed improvement. I congratulate the aurhors for this effort as I myself have been benifitted

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Philip Justin Waya Philip Justin Waya
Animal Nutritionist
June 23, 2011
relay it is very important article and i need it very much i in the ministry we need to improve our locale breed to do so we need to get such this knowledge to support us
thanks
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Shaukat Khan Shaukat Khan
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
June 24, 2011
Really an informative article and we can even implement this technique in our local plane areas of Pakistan. Silent heat is the main factor responsible for vanishing our very potential reproductive animals. LTC has conducted a baseline survey in district Buner in 2010 where almost 59.70% farmers were of the opinion that they notice 2 to 3 years calving interval in their animals and due to the long calving interval they prefer to sell their precious animals for Slaughtering.
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June 24, 2011
The sources of the article are listed on the following website: http://genex.crinet.com/page3896/TheImportanceOfHeatDetection

Many additional educational articles can be found at http://genex.crinet.com/page49/LearningCenter
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August 11, 2011

It is an established fact that in time breeding is foundation of next successful calving and milk production. For successful dairy farming the shorter calving interval is the key factor. It is the only part of animal lactation cycle that can be manipulated all other physiological processes are unchangeable or dependent on it (like we cannot change gestation period and dry period in dependent on breeding period).
Economically one day delay in insemination can cause 10-12 US$ loss and if you miss one cycle of your 10% animals how much loss you would have to bear? Imagine it.
It is another problem that animals mostly come in heat late in night hours; especially in case of buffaloes. That is why heat detection is a problem in buffaloes. Only solution could be use of teaser bulls with color markings.

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October 17, 2011
With Estrous Detection Rates based squarely on Human Ability, the statistics say that only 70% of cases are successfully detected.
This article surely does throw ample light on the success formula of Heat Detection, right from the Secondary Heat Signs, to the managemental practices to be adopted in COWS.
But, in BUFFALOES, which tend to be more Seasonal Breeders & belong to the class of Silent Heat Animals, there is one sure shot method of Heat Detection which I have learnt the hard way in field - After carefully trimming the nails of the hand and sanitizing them with a good soap wash, Insert the Middle Finger into the Buffalo Vagina (to the maximum extent possible), gently drag the finger out by touching the ventral surface of vagina (care should be taken that the nail on the finger should not come in contact with the surface). Once the finger is out, test for the stickiness of the mucous fluid (if any). By placing the middle finger over the thumb of the same hand, if we can stretch the Clear mucous fluid to roughly 1.5 inches with out breaking, the Buffalo is in Mid Heat and should be inseminated within the next three hours for successful results.
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October 17, 2011
Has anyone used infrared cameras to detect heat?
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October 18, 2011

Very Informative article, but need more concentration on Heat detection Tools like Tail Paint Marker and other electronic devices, Activity Monitoring Devices may helpful in buffaloes or animals showing silent heat. its really wonderful article to help dairy farmers to minimize their loses

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October 19, 2011

Thanks for the great article, Even though a major share of information listed here share the insights of heat detection in a large commercial dairy operation, personally i feel that few points can be addeed such as most of the times of their socialization occurs on return from the parlor(not immidieately) but after spending some time at the feed bunk and alos the time when they had taken to the parlor in the alleys it will surely exibit both mounting others nad to be mounted.
In my opinion, it is of rarest possibility that abortion could occur by AI in a previously pregnant animal, even witht false heat, AI technician rarely he misses this on rectal palpation or atleast he will rethink of ot or would subject the animal for a vet check to confirmm the eraly pregnancy than to poke unncecssarily at the cervical plug.
Combinations of unrecognized estrus and low conception rates may lead to culling of normal cows : Normally the breeders are advised to put the cows which are not becoing pregnant after 3- 4 estrus cycles for vet check, witht advancements with all the estrus synch protocols the point above nmentioned may be ofd rarest possible scenario.

thanks

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Thitai Ngatia Thitai Ngatia
Biochemist
October 19, 2011

I have had problems with my dairy herd on the same issue of heat detection. This article is a real eye openner. I take this opportunity to thank the author for his insightful contribution , thank you and may god open to you more,
Thitai ngatia from Kenya, Nyeri County

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Muhammad Iqbal Sabir Muhammad Iqbal Sabir
Animal Nutritionist
October 20, 2011

It is good effort to make the Dairy Herd Managers to give due attention to most neglected factor ply pivotal role to make dairy farming activity viable & economical. Keeping in view deep observation of each animal during early and late night not only help heat detection but can also useful for over all health improvement of the herd , If dairy herd managers chalked out some breeding calendar suitable to their Ecological Conditions may further improve the breeding & reproductive indicators for successful dairy farming,
However my practical experience in this relevance is as under,
1) Chin Ball Marker Technique (CBMT) is most suitable for!
A) Every type of livestock either small & large ruminants
B) It is also use full for all type of environment with the help of teaser male animal
2) Heat Synchronization ( HS) in which all the selected breeding females are given hormonal therapy to come in heat at the same time mostly this technique is used in !
A) Wondrous technique of Embryo Transfer Technology (ETT) is another successful practice
B) It is also useful To manage continuous milk production at certain peak periods desired according to set goal and target already fixed for farm (Continuous Milk Production Flow) keeping in view the seasonality variation in supply & gap of milk production
C) It can also be used as hand tool to synchronize the ( Herd Replacement Stock )

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S Murali S Murali
Product Manager
October 24, 2011
Great article...This will be useful to all professional AI technicians to train them in a better way..Great effort by author.
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Dr. MD. Ali Asgar Khan Dr. MD. Ali Asgar Khan
Ph.D in Dairy Science, Post Doc in Animal Breeding
June 26, 2012

Thanks for the nice article. It is very important to heat detection for herd fertility and profitability of farm. It is also important to accurate heat detection and timing of insemination. Among others it is very important to observe that during time of insemination body temperature of cow not to be higher than normal body temperature of cow.

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September 10, 2012

A good article, however, it fails to mention the most effective heat detection tools available today. Tailpaint, visual observation, teaser bulls ets are now outdated methods of heat detection. In the world's leading dairy industries, farmers are improving their heat detection rates (and profits) by using heat-mount detectors such as Bulling Beacon, Heat Seeker and ScratchE. Leading heat detection companies, such as Beacon Heat Detectors (Australia) offer a range of products to suit all requirements and budgets. These types of detectors eliminate the need to monitor your herd in person, reduces the chance of missed heats and require less skill and experience to interpret when a cow is cycling.

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November 17, 2015
Great article. Thanks
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